Originally known as a self-edge, the term used since the 14th c. for a narrow tightly woven band on either edge of fabric parallel to the warp that prevents fabric from raveling. Modern weaving machines produce wide fabric and the weft (horizontal) yarn is cut on every pick (weft insertion). The selvage from antique narrow shuttle looms is formed as the shuttle passes back and forth during weaving. Since the yarn is not cut, the selvage is tightly bound and forms a clean edge. These old shuttle looms predate WWII and run on original wooden parts driven by leather belts creating a beautiful sound while making some of the most sought after denim in the world.